Carrot

Carrot - Introduced by the Romans, carrots have been popular for 2000 Years. Now carrot is also grown in Pakistan. The Carrot is the second most popular vegetable in the world after the potato. Carrot is an erect (30–120 cm high) The colour of the root in the cultivated varieties ranges from white, yellow, orange, light purple, or deep red to deep violet and black.

AVAILABILITY

THE SCIENCE OF CARROT


Carrot (DoucsCarlota) is a very poplar vegetable in Pakistan. It is rich in carotene, a precursor of Vitamin A, and contains appreciable quantities of thiamine and riboflavin. It belongs to the Umbelliferae family and is probably a native of Europe and British Isles.

HEALTH BENEFITS

1. ANTIOXIDANT BENEFITS
All varieties of carrots contain valuable amounts of antioxidant nutrients. Included here are traditional antioxidants like vitamin C, as well as phytonutrient antioxidants like beta-carotene. The list of carrot phytonutrient antioxidants is by no means limited to beta-carotene, however.

2. CARDIOVASCULAR BENEFITS
Given their antioxidant richness, it's not surprising to find numerous research studies documenting the cardiovascular benefits of carrots. Our cardiovascular system needs constant protection from antioxidant damage. This is particularly true of our arteries, which are responsible for carrying highly oxygenated blood.

3. VISION HEALTH
Researchers at the Jules Stein Institute at the University of California at Los Angeles determined that women who consume carrots at least twice per week - in comparison to women who consume carrots less than once per week - have significantly lower rates of glaucoma (damage to the optic nerve often associated with excessive pressure inside the eye). Intake of geranyl acetate - one of the phytonutrients that is present in carrot seeds (and sometimes extracted from purified carrot seed oil) has also been repeatedly associated with reduced risk of cataracts in animal studies.

4. ANTI-CANCER BENEFITS
 The anti-cancer benefits of carrot have been best researched in the area of colon cancer. Some of this research has involved actual intake of carrot juice by human participants, and other research has involved the study of human cancer cells types in the lab. Lab studies have shown the ability of carrot extracts to inhibit the grown of colon cancer cells, and the polyacetylenes found in carrot (especially falcarinol) have been specifically linked to this inhibitory effect.